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The history of paper shredder

Paper shredders are being widely used either in offices or private homes nowadays. The main purpose of using a paper shredder is to destroy unwanted and confidential documents, disks or plastic cards to protect our privacy and personal information. But have you ever been curious about who first came up the idea of inventing a paper shredder to shred documents? And have you ever thought about the history of the development of paper shredder?
Here is a brief history about paper shredder
The invention of papyrus in ancient Egypt thousands of years ago. And as documents containing errors, sensitive or inaccurate material needed to be destroyed, manually tear up the papyrus is not enough. So the paper shredding industry has come a long was since then. 

The first known early mechanical paper shredder actuallycreated was in Germany in 1935 by a man called Adolf Ehinger.  After being questioned about anti-Nazi papers in the trash. He was inspired by a hand-cranked pasta maker to create a machine that can shred sentive material that could get him into trouble. He invented a hand-cranked shredder that sat in a wooden frame and was big enough to handle a sheet of paper. He ladded a motor to power the device later, and sold shredders throughout the 1940s to a variety of government entities and embassies.

The Cold War increased the popularity of Ehinger's device through the 1950's, and in 1959 his company created the first cross cut shredder that cut paper not only into strips, but cut it into tiny bits for an increased level of security.

The Cold War increased the popularity of Ehinger's device through the 1950's, and in 1959 his company created the first cross cut shredder that cut paper not only into strips, but cut it into tiny bits for an increased level of security.

Since their invention, shredders have played an important role in many great historical moments. Before the 1980s, shredders were used almost only by government and military organizations. As privacy concerns, the threat of identity theft and laws prohibiting burning garbage in many areas have increased, paper shredders have been adopted across the private sector - first by businesses, and now, gradually, by private citizens. And as document transmission has shifted from papers to digital files, shredders have improved their capacities to shred not only paper, but also paper clips, staples, DVDs, CDs and plastic identity and credit cards.